Video Series: Stability & Mobility

Stabilization, whether physical or mental, is a process that overcomes the destabilizing effects of daily living, competition in sports and recreation, and prevention of needless non-contact injury. From a physical standpoint, stabilization of the shoulder, hip, ankle, and spine are critical to enhanced performance. For the everyday wear and tear of daily living, stabilization provides for mobilization – as one body part provides control, its associated counterpart provides motion – with motion comes function.

In this series:

Hip Stability, Mobility & Strength

Assume an “all-fours” position on a mat – with arms outstretched, hands flat on the ground and knees bent to 90-degrees, and spine straight. Place a very light weight (1 pound) in the crease of one knee and hold into position by contracting the hamstring to prevent movement of the weight. Perform flexion (forward) / extension (backward movements) followed by lifting the involved leg sideways (like a male dog at a fire hydrant). Relocate the weight to the opposite leg and repeat. Try 5-10 of each movement.

Balance Stability and Mobility

Using a 4”x4”x 6-foot beam (cost is $15.00 at Loews), cut the beam into two 3-foot sections. Place the short beam on a stable non-sliding surface or mat. Stand on the beam by lowering your center of gravity. (Note: Be careful not to roll the beam and twist your ankle.) Facing forward, perform ¼ squat, while dropping and catching a ball on the way down. Turn into a lunge position and try the same drop and catch. No ball is necessary, until you achieve a stable position on the beam. Then add movement.

Ankle Stability

Using a light band ideally or no band, set up in a modified, short range lung position, with the band below both ankle bones on one leg, that is fixed to an immobile object. Keeping the working foot flat on the ground move you knee toward the toes – gliding the knee forward, until you feel the stretch in the heel/Achilles area. Hold for a 2-count, return to the start and repeat.

Spine Stability

Assume an elevated, prone plank position – arms and legs extended – while contracting the abdominals and breathing normally. Alternate touching the right hand to the left shoulder and vice versa. Then alternate bring left knee to left outstretched elbow and vice versa. Finally drop the left hip toward the ground, rotate inward, and stretch out the left leg. Return and repeat with the right hip and leg. Try 5 complete circuits, while staying in the elevated plank position.

Shoulder Mobility Strength Circuit

Stabilization, whether physical or mental, is a process that overcomes the destabilizing effects of daily living, competition in sports and recreation, and prevention of needless non-contact injury. From a physical standpoint, stabilization of the shoulder, hip, ankle, and spine are critical to enhanced performance. For the everyday wear and tear of daily living, stabilization provides for mobilization – as one body part provides control, its associated counterpart provides motion – with motion comes function. Shoulder Stability / Mobility Strength Circuit Using the same set-up as the previous stability/mobility range of motion exercise, with or without the light weight, perform a “hitching a ride” motion with both arms, thumbs up. Lift the arms only several inches of the ground. Next perform a “W” motion squeezing the shoulder blades lightly – with elbow dropping the side of the waist at the mid-level of the back. Next, with arms outstretched and thumbs pointing forward, palms facing down, while squeezing the shoulder blades, lift both arms several inches off the ground in a “T” – spine and arms. Try 10 reps of each.

Shoulder Stability and Range of Motion

Stabilization, whether physical or mental, is a process that overcomes the destabilizing effects of daily living, competition in sports and recreation, and prevention of needless non-contact injury. From a physical standpoint, stabilization of the shoulder, hip, ankle, and spine are critical to enhanced performance. For the everyday wear and tear of daily living, stabilization provides for mobilization – as one body part provides control, its associated counterpart provides motion – with motion comes function. Shoulder Stability / Mobility Range of Motion: Lay prone (face down) on a mat with the arms outstretched – either holding in one hand a very light weight (maybe 1 pound) or no resistance at all. Using one hand, rotate behind the back in an “around the world” motion close to the ground, where you transfer the weight to the other hand. With no resistance, clap the hands together at the low back area and finish the
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